a man 4 all seasons's Blog

a blog about the weird and wonderful virtual world that is Second Life

Of Coffers, Mules and Drawers

with 15 comments

galland-homes-classic-sideboard-dresser-lost-n-found

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A beautiful new release from Galland Homes, this is the “Classic Sideboard/Dresser” which comes in a Holiday version with runner, candles and ornaments plus a version of the sideboard on its own.  Land Impact is 4 for the sideboard, candles are 3 LI each,  and the ornament group is 5 LI. Pieces are Copy/Modify so you can have more candles and alter the runner and candlesticks to a colour of your choice by tinting.  The candles have a warm glow to them with a good spread of light. Materials have been enabled for both versions. Pick up a copy from the current round of the Lost & Found Event, it’s only 125L$ for the duration of the Event (closes December 1st).

As this is Galland Homes and I like to include a bit of history about the piece in question, here’s a potted version of the evolution of furniture with drawers!

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The Chest of Drawers as we know it today first appeared in the 17th century, about the 1690s. It had developed over time from Coffers. These were first efforts to make pieces of furniture that offered some comfort in the home. A Coffer is a long, deep box which is raised off the ground with either legs or feet. It has a lift up lid and is a bit like a modern blanket box. They were secure places for weapons, food larders and places to keep clothing clean and dry.

Coffers often had large grab handles on each side for easy transportation. In troubled times, when a person might need to up and leave at short notice – as an invading army or raiders were closing in, for instance – they would chuck all their valuables into their Coffer and off they could go running for the hills and safety with all their worldly goods in one place.

Some Coffers even acted as vaults or banks. For example, in the 12th century Henry II ordered that plain, planked Coffer chests should be placed in all churches for cash contributions for the relief of the Holy Land.

Later on, furniture makers began to add a drawer to the bottom of the Coffer, to keep things within easy reach. These were called Mule Chests and became very popular as folks realised they’d been losing items in the bottom of their Coffers for years – so the extra drawer was practical. It didn’t take long for the whole of the carcass to be filled with drawers and the lift up lid to be dispensed with. Chest of drawers haven’t really been altered or improved much since then, and have become an essential item of home furniture.

galland-homes-classic-sideboard-dresser-candles

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Here’s the extra Home & Garden items I used in the picture:

Twisty Twigs Vase Duo L – Pinstripes –Storax Tree
Feline Treasures – Naptime – Black Hydrangea copy version –  Storax Tree
Zinnias – Tiny Brass Incense Burner – MP gift
Picture – my own, the Goddess of Spring
LG Green & Tan Mahal RUG MESH – La Galleria

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Visit the Lost & Found Event

Visit Galland Homes for more beautiful furniture and prefabs

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15 Responses

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  1. Beautiful decor Moz!

    Moonsoul Resident

    30/11/2016 at 6:08 am

  2. Beautiful! And I love a dose of history with my pretties 🙂

  3. Loving the look and feel of the illustration Moz! xo

    landacrystal

    03/12/2016 at 12:39 am

    • Thank you, my dear friend! I think the candles made it look so cosy and ethereal in a way, like the promise of the Goddess of Spring, a strong Pagan symbol of renewal after the cold, barren winter season.

      Moz Loordes

      03/12/2016 at 7:13 pm

  4. gorgeous!

    the dune mouse

    05/12/2016 at 3:46 am

  5. Love all the coffers info Mozingtons. Of course, it makes sense of the old sayings like ‘there’s nothing in the coffers’ meaning we have no money. It’s amazing how much you can take for granted with language and not know where it came from in the first place.

    ReadMeri

    06/12/2016 at 11:08 am

  6. Nice Moz and cute cat!

    SueGeeli DeCuir

    07/12/2016 at 1:20 pm


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